NASSPE IV

Saturday and Sunday, October 11 and 12, 2008 (Columbus Day weekend)

NASSPE’s fourth international conference took place at the Memphis Marriott Downtown, just ten minutes from Graceland.
The text below reflects this web page as of October 10, 2008:

Our conference will feature a total of forty different sessions, covering best practice for single-gender classrooms in every age group and in almost every subject area, led by experienced educators from all over the United States as well as from Canada, Australia, Germany, and Spain.

Who should attend?

    A secondary audience for our conferences includes researchers who are interested in single-sex education - or more broadly, who are interested in gender differences in education -- as well as educators who are leading coed classrooms, but who have an interest in gender differences.

Who will be speaking? What will they be talking about?

Click here to see our list of speakers and topics.

What's the overall agenda for the conference? Exactly when does it start and end? What meals are served?

A continental breakfast, and complete hot buffet lunch, both Saturday and Sunday, are included in your registration fee. Conference activities run from 8:30 AM to 4:00 PM both Saturday and Sunday.
Click here for more detailed information about the conference agenda.

Where should I stay? How much does the hotel cost? What amenities will be provided?

We recommend that all conference attendees stay at the Memphis Marriott Downtown, our host hotel, which is adjacent to (and connected to) the Memphis Convention Center, where all conference activities will take place. We have negotiated a discounted rate for this conference, beginning Friday night October 9 and extending through Monday October 13 (Columbus Day). You can make reservations at the discounted rate by clicking here.

All attendees will have free access to the high-speed wireless Internet cafe at the Convention Center.

We will also have a special concierge on duty at the Memphis Marriott booth to assist you in arranging fun things to do in the Memphis area, including live music, world-renowned restaurants and Memphis barbecue, as well as helping arrange chartered bus tours to Graceland.

Ready to Register?

Click here to register via secure server
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If you're not using a credit card, please
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How much does it cost? How do I register?

The registration fee is $360.00 per person, for individuals registering alone.
For groups of 2, 3, or 4, registering together, the fee drops to $330.00 per person.
For groups of 5 or more, registering together, the registration fee is $300.00 per person.
Speakers receive a discount of $100 off the applicable registration fee.

Refunds:We will refund 90% of the registration fee if your refund request is received before September 1; between September 1 and October 1, just 50%; after October 1, no refunds can be provided.

ONLINE: If you would like to register ONLINE using a credit card, via our secure server, please click here.

VIA FAX: If you would like to FAX your registration information to us, you may CLICK HERE to fill out the registration form at this link, then print it out and fax it to 610 993 3139.

BY MAIL: If you're not using a credit card, please CLICK HERE TO FILL OUT THE ONLINE REGISTRATION FORM ; then please mail the form, along with your check or purchase order, to NASSPE, 64 E. Uwchlan Ave., #259, Exton, Pennsylvania 19341-1203. Or, you may fax the form to 610 993 3139.

Purchase orders will be accepted only from accredited schools, colleges, and universities.
If you have questions about methods of payment, please call NASSPE at 301 461 5065 during our business hours (9 AM to 4 PM Eastern time, Monday through Friday), and ask to speak with Katie.

Speakers and topics

Here's an almost-complete listing of the 40 sessions you'll have the opportunity to hear at our conference:

    General session (Dr. Sax) and keynote speakers (Professor Kelleher and Professor Baumeister)

  • Sunday morning keynote: "Is there anything good about boys?"
    Dr. Roy Baumeister, Professor of Psychology and Director of Social Psychology at Florida State University
    Tallahassee, Florida
    Short description of Professor Baumeister's keynote

  • Sunday afternoon keynote: "Storytelling ALICE: how to get teenage girls excited about computer science"
    Dr. Caitlin Kelleher, professor of computer science at Washington University
    St. Louis, Missouri
    Short description of Professor Kelleher's keynote

  • General session: The Agony and the Ecstasy: latest news from the trenches
    Dr. Leonard Sax, Executive Director, NASSPE
    Malvern, Pennsylvania
    Short description of this session
  • Breakout sessions

  • Middle School Chemistry for Girls
    Beth Roueché
    Langston Charter Middle School
    Greenville, South Carolina
    Short description of this session

  • Self-esteem: does it matter? for girls? for boys?
    Professor Roy Baumeister
    Florida State University
    Tallahassee, Florida
    Short description of this session

  • Single-sex education in public schools: what's happening around the world
    Josep Maria Barnils
    European Association for Single-Sex Education
    Barcelona, Spain and Geneva, Switzerland
    Short description of this session

  • Meet David and Mary Beth (literacy for boys, math for girls)
    Ruth Owens and Shannon Ingram
    Beech Hill Elementary School
    Summerville, South Carolina
    Short description of this session

  • Launching a single-gender program: keys to success
    David Chadwell, Director of Single Gender Initiatives for the State of South Carolina
    Columbia, South Carolina
    Short description of this session

  • Girls love music; boys can too!
    Sandi Chasson
    York, Ontario (Canada)
    Short description of this session

  • Leisure time reading: for girls / for boys
    Linda Staskus
    Cuyahoga County Public Libraries
    Parma, Ohio
    Short description of this session

  • Show Me What You Know: An Agenda Notebook of Math Strategies
    Sandra B. Allison
    Columbia, South Carolina
    Short description of this session

  • A Girl-Centered Science Curriculum
    Marriah Schwallier Degenhardt
    Columbia, South Carolina
    Short description of this session

  • Teaching the Male Brain
    Dr. Abigail Norfleet James
    Orange, Virginia
    Short description of this session

  • Beyond Anecdotes: setting up a powerful evaluation design in your single-sex classroom
    Dr. Margaret M. Ferrara / Dr. Peter J. Ferrara
    University of Nevada Reno (UNR) / Multiple Perspectives About Teaching (MPAT)
    Reno, Nevada
    Short description of this session

  • Getting boys excited about school
    Four years' experience in a public elementary school

    Bill Bender and Stefani Prince
    Foley Intermediate School
    Foley, Alabama
    Short description of this session

  • Best practice for high school English: girls' classrooms and boys' classrooms
    Sara Keller & Amy Richardson
    Boston, Massachusetts
    Short description of this session

  • Best practice for high school biology and chemistry: girls' classrooms compared with boys' classrooms
    Dr. Kathryn Wiens
    Boston, Massachusetts
    Short description of this session

  • Developmental Aspects of Single-Gender Classrooms: How do boys and girls differ?
    Elizabeth Heins, Doug MacIsaac, Kathy Piechura, and Mercedes Tichenor
    Stetson University
    Short description of this session

  • Rocketing Readers: motivating elementary school boys to read
    Woodward Avenue Elementary School
    Deland, Florida
    Short description of this session

  • Madame Curie's Protegées: motivating elementary school girls in science
    Woodward Avenue Elementary School
    Deland, Florida
    Short description of this session

  • Single-Gender Classes: the data tells the story
    Ronald Mackin, Principal
    Kingsbury Middle School
    Memphis, Tennessee
    Short description of this session

  • De-traumatizing African-American Boys
    Benjamin Wright
    Nashville, Tennessee
    Short description of this session

  • Teaching the Female Brain
    Dr. Abigail Norfleet James
    Orange, Virginia
    Short description of this session

  • Single-Sex Classes in the Urban High School
    Booker T. Washington High School
    Memphis, Tennessee
    Short description of this session

  • Knock 'Em Out The Box! Using Hip Hop and Other Art Forms to Teach Poetry and Storytelling
    Rita Renee Hunter-Graham
    Atlanta, Georgia
    Short description of this session

  • Implementation of single-sex classrooms in a coed high school
    Dr. Timothy Wiens and Tracy Greenwalt
    Boston, Massachusetts
    Short description of this session

  • Helping Students, Staff, Parents and Politicians Understand and Accept Single Gender Education
    Doug Trimble, Principal
    C. B. Stirling School
    Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)
    Short description of this session

  • The Rite Journey: creating rites of passage to turn teenage boys into men
    Andrew Lines
    Nairne, South Australia
    Short description of this session

  • Launching a single-gender program in a coed public school
    Lee Mansell, Principal
    Foley Intermediate School
    Foley, Alabama
    Short description of this session

  • Upbeats and Downbeats: 6th grade single-sex classes in a coeducational school
    Dr. Mavis Leathley and Dr. James Studer
    Desert Heights Elementary School
    Reno, Nevada
    Short description of this session

  • Boys Don't Cry: Recognizing and responding to depression in boys
    Malia Blom, Director
    Boys and Schools, a program of the Men's Health Network
    Short description of this session

  • Empowering the African-American Male
    Eric Brown
    Killian Elementary
    Columbia, South Carolina
    Short description of this session

  • Mentoring Girls: what works
    LaKeacha Jett
    Social Butterflies Youth Services, Inc.
    Atlanta, Georgia
    Short description of this session

  • Single-sex classrooms: the German experience
    Markus Meier
    Hesse, Germany
    Short description of this session

  • Using team strategies to motivate boys -- and girls!
    Jack Gitler
    Oakbrook Middle School
    Oakbrook, South Carolina
    Short description of this session

  • What has and has NOT worked for boys of color: lessons learned from a boys' public school
    Clyde Cole, Principal
    ABCD Academy
    New York, New York
    Short description of this session

  • Community Partnerships Strengthen a Boys' School
    Curt Green
    Principal, B.E.S.T. Academy at Benjamin S. Carson
    Atlanta, Georgia
    Short description of this session

  • Boy-Friendly Methods for Teaching Spanish
    Ken Scheiber
    Arden, North Carolina
    Short description of this session

  • Best Practice for Teaching Math to Middle-School Boys
    Ramon Garner
    B.E.S.T. Academy at Benjamin S. Carson
    Atlanta, Georgia
    Short description of this session

  • The Golden Ambassadors
    Curt Green
    Principal, B.E.S.T. Academy at Benjamin S. Carson
    Atlanta, Georgia
    Short description of this session


    Session Descriptions

    Keynotes

    • "Is there anything good about boys?"
    • Dr. Roy Baumeister, Professor of Psychology and Director of Social Psychology at Florida State University
      Tallahassee, Florida
      Boys everywhere are more likely to break the rules and ignore the grown-ups, compared with girls. This phenomenon is very robust across cultures. How come? Is there anything good about boys? A better understanding of what makes boys tick might lead to more effective teaching - and parenting. (This presentation is adapted from Professor Baumeister's hugely popular invited address at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.)

    • Storytelling ALICE: how to get teenage girls excited about computer science
    • Dr. Caitlin Kelleher, professor of computer science at Washington University, is a world leader in best practice for engaging teenage girls in computer science. While earning her Ph.D. in computer science, Dr. Kelleher noticed that much of computer science -- particularly in artificial intelligence -- seemed to be devoted to making virtual worlds in which you could blow things up, or race exotic vehicles. Dr. Kelleher pointed out that many girls don't get excited about blowing things up or racing exotic vehicles. She developed a different way of teaching computer science, built around storytelling. And her approach works. Girls who use her approach are three times more likely to want extra time doing computer science, compared with girls who are taught the traditional way.

      General Session

    • "The Agony and the Ecstasy"
      Leonard Sax MD PhD
      Executive Director, NASSPE
      Malvern, Pennsylvania
      In this opening session, Dr. Sax will share some high points and low points in the recent history of single-sex education in the United States. Some topics:
      1. The lesson of Greene County, Georgia: how to guarantee that your program will FAIL
      2. A tip from Auckland, New Zealand: how speeddating in French can make your school better!
      3. What the AAUW doesn't know about girls -- and what we can teach them
      4. What we can learn from Australia -- and why they envy us
      5. Three things you MUST know if your program is going to live long -- and prosper!

    • Middle School Chemistry for Girls
      Beth Roueché
      Langston Charter Middle School
      Greenville, South Carolina
      All classes at Langston Charter Middle School are single-sex: girls in girls' classrooms, boys in boys' classrooms. I cover exactly the same material with the girls as I do with the boys; the girls and the boys have the exact same questions on the test. But I take a completely different route to get there. What works for girls doesn't work for boys, and vice versa. In this workshop, I will present lesson plans I use for accomplishing specific curriculum items with girls and with boys. I will also provide strategies for each particular lesson.

    • Self-esteem: does it matter? for girls? for boys?
      Professor Roy Baumeister
      Florida State University
      Tallahassee, Florida
      For roughly thirty years, most American educators have believed that there is a positive correlation between self-esteem and academic achievement. Students who believe they are smart do better than students who don't believe they are smart -- or thus went the conventional wisdom. Recent research demonstrates a much more complex and indeed troubled relationship between self-esteem and academic achievement -- with some remarkable gender effects.

    • Single-sex education in public schools: what's happening around the world Josep Maria Barnils
      European Association for Single-Sex Education
      Barcelona, Spain
      Josep Maria Barnils is a co-founder of the European Association for Single-Sex Education. He has helped to establish new single-sex schools throughout central and eastern Europe, as well as in Mexico, Central America, and South America. He will present his findings on the state of the movement in more than thirty countries around the world. This seminar will provide a unique opportunity to hear what's happening, first-hand, from the man who knows more than any other individual in the world (literally!) about single-sex education in Europe, the Americas, and Africa.

    • Meet David and Mary Beth (literacy for boys, math for girls)
      Ruth Owens, 2nd grade teacher - literacy
      Shannon Ingram, 5th grade teacher - math
      Beech Hill Elementary School
      Summerville, South Carolina
      This is a hands-on opportunity for participants to experience a single gender classroom from the point of view of the students -- not the teachers. Using research from their own classrooms, the presenters will guide participants in a journey into the academic worlds of single gender students in a boys' second grade literacy class and a girls' fifth grade math class. This session is designed to provide teachers with a fresh perspective on addressing the specific needs of single gender students in lower and upper elementary school.

    • Implementing a single-gender program at your school
      David Chadwell, Director of Single Gender Initiatives for the State of South Carolina
      Columbia, South Carolina
      David Chadwell was the inaugural Lead Teacher for Boys at the very successful TWO Academies at Dent Middle School in Columbia, South Carolina. For the past year, Mr. Chadwell has been helping to launch single-gender programs around the state of South Carolina. Mr. Chadwell will share his experience -- both during his three years at the TWO Academies and at single-gender programs in other public schools -- with particular attention to the key ingredients for success in launching a single-gender program. Questions he will address include:
      Should I implement a single-gender program at my school?
      If so, how should it be structured?
      How should I promote and/or publicize the program?
      What kind of support do teachers need?

      Mr. Chadwell will provide answers to these questions, and others, along with a detailed outline and templates.

    • Show Me What You Know: An Agenda Notebook of Math Strategies
      Sandra B. Allison
      Two Academies, Dent Middle School
      Columbia, South Carolina
      The math agenda helps middle school boys and girls organize their math assignments. It is a valuable classroom tool which includes technology-based project outlines, games, and graphic organizers. It provides daily structure for students and parents using a variety of strategies to help students master their math curriculum. Participants in this session will complete skill and real-world word problem activities using samples from the agenda notebook. Most of the activities move from iconic to verbal learning models. This strategy has been used with our boys and with our girls. This session will include a discussion of how the implementation differed for each gender. The target audience for this session includes teachers in grades 5-12 as well as administrators.

    • Girls love music; boys can too!
      Sandi Chasson
      St. Andrew's College
      York, Ontario (Canada)
      Ms. Chasson has taught music in coed classrooms for more than ten years, in girls' classrooms for ten years, and most recently in boys' classrooms for seven years. She has a unique perspective on what works for teaching music to girls, and to boys. Her conclusion: both girls and boys are equally capable of learning to love music. But the best way to engage girls in music is quite different from the best way to engage boys.

    • Leisure time reading: for girls / for boys
      Linda Staskus
      Cuyahoga County Public Libraries
      Parma, Ohio
      We know that teachers who understand gender differences can teach any of the great books to girls AND to boys. But what about leisure-time reading? What books are best to recommend for vacation reading to girls -- and to boys? What kind of girl likes what kind of book? How about boys? This presentation goes way beyond the usual lists of stereotypical "girls' books" and "boys' books."

    • Beyond Anecdotes: setting up a powerful evaluation design in your single-sex classroom Dr. Margaret M. Ferrara / Dr. Peter J. Ferrara
      University of Nevada Reno / Multiple Perspectives About Teaching
      Reno, Nevada
      You are ready to begin a single-sex classroom but you will need to consider how you will know if the innovation makes a difference. What do you do? This presentation covers multiple data collection techniques to help you receive funding and approval from the district, your community, and beyond. Topics covered include the importance of finding an external evaluator; the value in teacher and student journaling; using resources that already exist in your school to collect data (preservice teachers, parents); and making your evaluation report press-worthy. Attendees will receive a CD with the template for data collection tools and an evaluation report outline.

    • Helping Students, Staff, Parents and Politicians Understand and Accept Single Gender Education
      Doug Trimble, Principal
      C. B. Stirling School
      Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)
      C.B. Stirling Elementary School (actually a K-8 school) in Hamilton, Ontario, has offered the choice of single gender or mixed classes to students in grades 7 and 8 since September 2003. In June of 2007, over 98% of the parents of students entering grades 7 and 8 selected single gender classes over mixed classes as their preferred placement.
      In this presentation, we will consider not only the process followed to create this unique learning environment, but also the underlying educational beliefs that created the trust necessary to have parents accept this format. Participants will hear about the challenges faced by administrators, staff, and students as the concept has evolved. Research findings by Brock University, The Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), and the Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board's Research Department will be shared. Teachers and administrators involved in implementing single gender programs at their schools would benefit from this presentation.

    • Knock 'Em Out The Box! Using Hip Hop and Other Art Forms to Teach Poetry & Storytelling
      Rita Renee Hunter Graham
      Atlanta, Georgia

      This presentation uses a male-dominated, internationally-popular cultural phenomenon -- Hip Hop -- to help boys to find their own voices. This approach allows boys to express themselves within a given format and teaches them how to transfer the knowledge they presently have to the traditional or classical literature they will encounter as they progress academically. We teach boys about the components of modern day songs by KRS-One, Tupac or Grandmaster Flash while teaching Shakespeare, Richard Wright, Walter Dean Myers, Toni Morrison, and William Golding. This strategy for teaching and learning builds bridges between cultures, time periods and learning styles. Specifically, with this program boys can breakdance, rap, draw, write, and create music all the while not worrying about impressing or feeling intimidated by the presence of girls.

    • The Rite Journey: creating rites of passage to turn teenage boys into men
      Andrew Lines
      Nairne, South Australia
      ‘The Rite Journey’ is an Australian initiative which allows each male student to share in a year long partnership with their teacher-guide as they explore what it means to be a respectful and responsible adult in their society. We believe that rites of passage should be rediscovered for boys in our Western culture. Consequently, a central feature of our program is the specially-created ceremonies held throughout the year. These celebration points and rites of passage follow the concept of the seven steps of a hero's journey: the call, the threshold, the following, the challenges, getting lost, the return and the homecoming.

      Some of the content covered includes ‘Personal Biography’, ‘Gender Identity and Construction’, ‘Feelings and Beliefs’, ‘Love, Relationships and Sexuality’, ‘Anger, Bullying, Depression and Violence’, ‘Risk Taking’, ‘Stillness, Meditation and Relaxation’, ‘Communication’ and ‘Mentoring’. These topics are explored through the four themes: Relationship with Self, Others, Life, and the World. We employ initiatives such as a Solo Camping Experience, Adventure Camps, World Drumming, Rock and Water, Journal Writing, Mentoring, Talking Sticks and Juggling along with the establishment of strong connection points with the students, teacher-guide, parents, mentors and peers. A strength of the program is its adaptability to schools in various cultures and contexts. At present the program is being taught in a number of South Australian schools. This workshop will explore the genesis of the program and how it is implemented in schools along with feedback from staff, parents and students.

    • Upbeats and Downbeats: 6th grade single-sex classes in a coeducational school
      Dr. Mavis Leathley and Dr. James Studer
      Desert Heights Elementary School
      Reno, Nevada
      What lessons can we learn from the placement of teachers in a sixth grade with single-gender classrooms, e.g. a female teacher with all girls, a male teacher with all boys? What differences might there be with a female teacher with girls and boys? In the first year of implementing single-sex classrooms, we reviewed longitudinal achievement data; student attendance; behavior management, and the use of teacher instructional strategies. Topics to be addressed in this session include: preservice teacher insights; teacher journaling; too much "boyness" in the boys' classroom; intuitive teaching strategies; the reassignment of teachers (female teacher in the male classroom and vice versa); a data review, and single-sex instructional strategies used and not used.

    • Teaching the Male Brain
      Dr. Abigail Norfleet James, Rockhouse Associates
      Orange, Virginia
      As more boys are being identified as having learning problems, more information is being uncovered which supports the notion that boys learn well when classroom activities are designed to use their academic strengths. Teach to boys' strengths, rather than focussing on their weaknesses. This workshop will present findings from recent research and connect that information to teaching strategies which maximize boys' learning. Participants will acquire specific strategies to implement in their classrooms to increase student engagement through a variety of active learning approaches. Participants will also receive handouts of the PowerPoint slides together with directions for the approaches described in the presentation.

    • A Girl-Centered Science Curriculum
      Marriah Schwallier Degenhardt
      Columbia, South Carolina
      This session will provide an overview of effective strategies for a girl-centered science classroom. We will consider not only lessons and activities, but also classroom environment and organization. This session is intended primarily for science teachers, particularly middle school grades.

    • Developmental Aspects of Single-Gender Classrooms: How do boys and girls differ?
      Elizabeth Heins, Doug MacIsaac, Kathy Piechura, and Mercedes Tichenor
      Stetson University
      How do teachers design effective instruction for girls and boys who develop at different times and rates? This presentation will provide an overview of gender differences in development and learning. Presenters will share information on the developmental aspects of single-gender programs at both the primary and intermediate grades and how developmental differences can impact pedagogy, student motivation, and most importantly, student learning.

    • Getting boys excited about school:
      Four years' experience in a public elementary school

      Bill Bender and Stefani Prince
      Foley Intermediate School
      Foley, Alabama
      Bill Bender and Stefani Prince, both teachers at Foley Intermediate School (4th and 5th grades), will discuss what they have learned about boys while teaching all-boys classes. Mr. Bender's 4th-grade all-boy class became Ms. Lawson's 5th-grade class. That cohort of boys -- boys who had single-sex classes in both 4th grade and 5th grade -- scored higher on the Alabama Reading and Math Test (ARMT) reading subtest than any other group in the school. On a scale of 1 to 4, 90% of those boys scored a "4" on the reading test. Ms. Prince and Mr. Bender will share the strategies which they found most effective in engaging every boy in the classroom.

    • Best practice for high school English: girls' classrooms and boys' classrooms
      Sara Keller & Amy Richardson
      Boston, Massachusetts
      When creating a lesson for girls, it is helpful to find a way in which the students can connect personally to the texts. "How would you feel if you were the girl in this story?" It is also helpful, for many girls, to progress through levels of questioning and self-analysis; the girls often need very little prompting to do this on their own.

      When teaching boys, it is more important to vary the type of activity and instruction. The teacher must create a "scaffolding" of questions and analysis. Boys' classrooms often require more prompting from the teacher. When instructing boys, it is often helpful to begin with the concrete and move to the abstract.

    • Using team strategies to motivate boys -- and girls!
      Jack Gitler
      Oakbrook Middle School
      Oakbrook, South Carolina
      Team activities can be useful to motivate both girls and boys in single-gender classrooms. The team activity can take place both inside and outside of the classroom. Through team building, the students were more willing to work with others, and network with different students in the classroom outside of their usual peer groups. The activities generally involve movement, problem solving, and group work to complete.

    • Teaching the Female Brain
      Dr. Abigail Norfleet James, Rockhouse Associates
      Orange, Virginia
      The idea that math is difficult for girls - and the corresponding idea that most girls are not 'naturally' interested in mathematics - is pervasive. According to widely-held beliefs, girls should not be expected to do well in math or science because their academic strength lies in words. This workshop will present research from recent findings and connect that information to teaching strategies which maximize girls' learning. Participants will gain a clear understanding of best classroom practices for girls in math and science. Participants will also receive handouts of the PowerPoint slides together with directions for the approaches described in the presentation. In addition, participants will observe some of the strategies in the workshop so that they will have a clear idea of how to implement the approaches in their own classrooms.


      Conference agenda

      The conference begins informally Friday evening at 6 PM with a welcoming reception at the Marriott, at which time attendees are encouraged to pick up their registration packets (in order to avoid the lines Saturday morning).

      The conference officially begins Saturday morning with registration and a continental breakfast. We will open at 9 AM Saturday morning with a general session led by Dr. Sax entitled "The Agony and the Ecstasy." We then will break for the first round of breakout sessions, followed by lunch at 12 noon. Following the hot buffet lunch, the second round of breakout sessions begins at 1 PM on Saturday; the third round of breakout sessions begins at 2:30 PM.

      We begin Sunday morning again with a continental breakfast, followed by Professor Baumeister's keynote "Is there anything good about boys?" Then we will have our fourth breakout session, followed by another hot buffet lunch at 12 noon. Sunday afternoon, Professor Kelleher will deliver the final keynote address, followed by our final breakout session. The conference concludes with a special "bookstore" with books of relevance to gender and education.

      The conference will end at 4 PM Sunday afternoon.

      Comments from attendees at recent NASSPE Conferences:

      "This was my first NASSPE conference. I had a wonderful time. The environment, food, and staff were all top notch. There was great diversity in the breakout sessions. Speakers were very informative."
      James W. Blackmon, Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools, Tennessee

      "I really enjoyed this conference. I get so much information and ideas from fellow teachers who are also doing single-sex education. Fellowshipping with others who are doing what I am doing, I KNOW that I am doing the right thing!"
      Daryl Jackson, Aberdeen Primary School, Aberdeen, North Carolina

      "The NASSPE conference is always a great opportunity to network with others on the front lines of gender-specific classrooms. Learning new strategies and having existing strategies affirmed has been helpful. It was nice to collaborate and learn from experts in the field. It really helps to validate the whole process for me. Thanks!"
      Annette Duncan, Cunningham Elementary School, Waterloo, Iowa

      "This was a fabulous, insightful and interesting conference. I am so glad I came. It felt like family. It was good to network with teachers, counselors and administrators from all different experiences to bring to the board. It was also a great representation of schools from all over the States, as well as from Iceland, Spain, Canada, Mexico, and Australia."
      Denise Blakely, San Luis Obispo, California

      "This conference was the best professional development I have ever experienced - in 30 years of teaching. Thank you for the careful, insightful preparation given to this day, and for your evident passion for this work!"
      Terry Hume, Robert Turner Elementary School, Lawrenceburg, Kentucky


       

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