How does school format single-sex vs. coed affect the risk of developing eating disorders?

 

 

Title

Effect of gender composition of school on body concerns in adolescent women.

Abstract

Investigated the role of gender composition of school on body figure preferences, eating disorder symptomology, and role concerns. Questionnaires were completed by 261 adolescent girls (mean age 16.1 yrs) in 2 private single-sex and 2 private coeducational school environments. Results show that there was no difference in nominated ideal figure or eating disorder scores between the schools. However, girls in the single-sex schools placed a greater emphasis on achievement than their counterparts at the coeducational schools. These role concerns had a differential impact on prediction of the ideal figure, whereby the importance placed on intelligence and professional success predicted the choice of a thinner ideal figure for the single-sex schools, but a larger ideal for the coeducational schools. It was concluded that the motivation for thinness differs between single-sex and coeducational schools. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved)

Authors

Tiggemann, Marika

Affiliations

Tiggemann, Marika: Flinders U of South Australia, School of Psychology, Adelaide, SA, Australia

Source

International Journal of Eating Disorders. 29(2), Mar 2001, 239-243. http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0276-3478/.


 

 

Title

A comparison of female university students from different school backgrounds using the Eating Disorder Inventory.

Abstract

Compared the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI) scores of 647 16-60 yr old female university students who had previously attended single sex as opposed to co-educational schools and day schools as opposed to boarding schools. Students who had previously attended single sex schools and boarding schools obtained higher scores than their contemporaries from co-educational or day schools on some of the EDI subscales. Previous type of school appeared to represent a risk factor for higher scores on some EDI subscales, but this may only occur once the student has left school and progressed to university. Further research is needed to clarify any relationship between school experience and the occurrence of characteristics associated with the development of eating disorders. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved)

Authors

Limbert, Caroline

Affiliations

Limbert, Caroline: Oxford Brookes U, Psychology Dept, Oxford, England

Source

International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health. 13(2), Jan-Mar 2001, 145-154.

 

 



Title

The prevalence of disordered eating behaviours and attitudes in adolescent girls.

Abstract

The prevalence of disordered eating behaviors and the nature of body size estimation were examined in adolescent girls in Christchurch, New Zealand. Differences in these behaviors between single-sex and co-ed schools were also examined. Data were collected from 363 adolescent girls from 3 co-ed and 2 single-sex secondary schools. Each S completed the Eating Disorder Inventory-2 and the Figure Rating Scale. Results revealed a high prevalence of dieting (54%), bingeing (38%), and purging (up to 12%) in adolescent girls. The majority of the Ss (71%) desired to be a smaller size than they perceived themselves to be. There were no differences between single-sex and co-ed schools on the core disordered eating behaviors. Results show that there are high rates of disordered eating behaviors among adolescent girls and that high body mass index and low SES are associated with greater eating disordered attitudes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved)

Authors

Fear, Jennifer L.; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Sullivan, Patrick F.

Affiliations

Fear, Jennifer L.: Princess Margaret Hosp, Eating Disorders Service, Christchurch, New Zealand

Source

New Zealand Journal of Psychology. 25(1), Jun 1996, 7-12.

 

 


Title

The effect of school environment on body concerns in adolescent women.

Abstract

Investigated body figure preferences, eating disorder symptomatology, and role concerns in 142 Australian Caucasian adolescent girls in 2 different school environments, both of medium to high SES. Girls at a private single-sex school nominated a thinner ideal figure and displayed more eating disorder patterns than their counterparts at a private coeducational school. Although the schools did not differ in role concerns, these had a differential impact on prediction of the ideal figure. In particular, the importance placed on professional success predicted the choice of ideal figure for the single-sex but not for the coeducational school. Results indicate that what motivates the wish for thinness differed between the schools. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved)

Authors

Dyer, Geraldine; Tiggemann, Marika

Affiliations

Dyer, Geraldine: Flinders U of South Australia, School of Psychology, Adelaide, SA, Australia

Source

Sex Roles. 34(1-2), Jan 1996, 127-138. http://www.springeronline.com/sgw/cda/frontpage/0,11855,4-40109-70-35574530-0,00.html.